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Here is the first Section A reading practice for you.

This question requires you to skim read, pick out the relevant parts of the source and interpret linking to the question.

You must use quotations and explain.

You should take no more than 12 minutes on this once you've read the article and you should be writing 1/2 - 3/4 of a page. It is worth 8 marks.

Follow the link - http://m.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/nov/03/4g-national-parks-threat?cat=environment&type=article

What do we learn about the issues and benefits of overhead cables? (8 Marks)

Post your answers to or questions about Q1 in the comment section.

These comments are moderated before appearing so you may take some time to see them.



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Anonymous
9 November 2012 at 17:15

'Prioritise the expansion of broadband and 4G' implies that the use of overhead cables will give internet users and those who use broadband or 4G a better signal no matter where you live. This would appeal to those in rural areas that want internet because it will allow them to do so with a decent signal.
On the other hand 'It is feared that the Lake District landscapes that inspired William Wordsworth will be particularly under threat' portrays that it could ruin one of the top outdoor, rural Britain attractions. This would be a blow to many people including birdwatchers, walkers, bikers and just people who love the outdoors in general. As we can see, it may affect some of Britain's most attractive sights as well as some of the best outdoor places.
'The beauty of an area will help push the expansion of broadband and 4G' conveys that putting the internet cables into a rural area will push up the use of broadband and 4G, portraying that using an internet cable is a good way of getting signal and access.
'a cost of £2 million' emphasises that it is a fairly pricey idea. This means that many may not afford it. It also means that it will cost the government a lot of money, which we do not have.
Finally, 'masts and cables to be discreetly placed when it comes to parks and beauty spots' implies that they are not very attractive as they are being careful not to put them in attractive places so that the public are not infected by the change.

Jack Field

Anonymous
11 November 2012 at 16:14

One main thing that is to be seen to be an issue with these cables is that 'it is feared that the Lake districts landscapes that inspired William Wordsworth will be particularly under threat'. This can suggest to the reader that the overall beauty of the countryside which has inspired one of the true greats of English Poetry will be taken from people and will not allow people to see that same inspiring beauty as was seen to him. This issue can and will sympathise with the many fans of William Wordsworth and anyone who has an appreciation of English.

As the argument against the Cables is one about our history and past, the argument for it is one for the future of the English rural residents. With an effort to push the 'Expansion of Broadband and 4G and stimulate growth', many are saying that this is one consequenc or setback of having such a technologial advancment. Even if this 'Beauty spot' has to be jeopardized, many of a younger or densly populated area would refer to this as a neccesary requirement.

However this entire article is lenient to the ideas of there being issues with these cables being put up. 'Sarah Wright' from 'Mast Sanity, added that she was also concerned about the health implications for wildlife in the parks and beauty spots.' She is refering here to wildlife, which would be very herlpful in here argument against these cables as now she can have the support of the animal rights army on here side. Yes, by refering to the overall 'health implications' and 'wildlife' this could put a few of the residents of the area against the idea especially when thier health being suggested to be at risk.

11 November 2012 at 18:55

Jack - This question answer would gain you 5 / 8 marks roughly a C grade.

You pick out and interpret quotations but a key problem with this answer is you don't make points before your quotations.

You should be structuring your answers like this with my addition to develop top marks:

A common problem in rural areas is a lack of broadband connections which the installation of over head cables will be of benefit and so to

'Prioritise the expansion of broadband and 4G' implies that the use of overhead cables will give internet users and those who use broadband or 4G a better signal no matter where you live providing a clear benefit.

Take one of the other points you have made and develop it like that. Post it here and I can check it.

11 November 2012 at 19:01

Your opening paragraph is particularly strong highlighting the ability to work within the top band. However the development of your article loses focus on specific benefits or issues, which is what the question asks you to comment on.

This would gain 6 out of 8 Marks.

Take this paragraph from your work:

'As the argument against the Cables is one about our history and past, the argument for it is one for the future of the English rural residents. With an effort to push the 'Expansion of Broadband and 4G and stimulate growth', many are saying that this is one consequenc or setback of having such a technologial advancment. Even if this 'Beauty spot' has to be jeopardized, many of a younger or densly populated area would refer to this as a necessary requirement.'

It would only need a sentence stating: 'many of a younger or densely populated area would refer to this as a necessary requirement clearly showing a benefit to people from the installation of these overhead cables.'

This is a basic but vital skill of 'signposting'. Simply put, this means pointing out to the examiner (this doesn't have to be obvious or clunky) that your work is focused on the question.

Anonymous
12 November 2012 at 22:04

Campaigners are 'concerned' about the issiue of animal harm in the he 'beauty spots' We also learn that the heritage of country side veiws plays a monstrous part in this debate, as telephone lines-along with other various cables will destroy what's left of british nature. Another 'fear' from campaigners is the 'latest plans for parks' set by electricity companies shan't happen, due to the latest technology, forced to be installed. A larger benefit though-planting more cables in the country has never affected the quality of the wires. Unfortunately the debate is not challenged by such a point to discontinue their disagreement. Lucy Edwards

12 November 2012 at 22:40

Lucy -

You'd probably get around half marks for this answer. You are embedding quotations and you are highlighting issues and benefits. The problem is that your quotations don't always highlight an issue or a benefit and although embedded, don't gain you any marks.

'Campaigners are 'concerned'' doesn't give me a quotation that highlights an issue or a concern.

This could be written - A key issue for campaigners is the countryside that inspired many people is 'under threat' from the 'unsightly cables' that could pop up due to relaxed planning regulations'.

Do you see the difference? One is using a quotation for the sake of it and one answers one of the key two parts of the question.

3 or 4 out of 8.

Anonymous
15 November 2012 at 17:06

On the other hand it could ruin one of the top outdoor, rural Britain attractions. This is portrayed in 'It is feared that the Lake District landscapes that inspired William Wordsworth will be particularly under threat'. This would be a blow to many people including birdwatchers, walkers, bikers and just people who love the outdoors in general.

Jack Field

15 November 2012 at 18:29

One of the main concerns against the overhead cables is that 'Britain's most protected countryside'is now as campaigners say going to be 'the biggest attack on national parks and areas of outstanding beauty in more than 50 years'. This suggests that these people believe that the beauty of these parks will be taken away by the overhead cables. This outlines why there's a need for overhead cables in these protected parks and beauty spot's. There is a point made about 'underground cables owned by BT should be used to save some of Britain's most picturesque sites' this could help the spread of broadband over the country but yet keep the beauty of the national parks, which then helps the growth of areas like this with people more interested.
An issue that is raised is that 'Parliament has established national parks with a clear purpose to protect their landscapes, wildlife and heritage and it is not appropriate to pick and choose when such protection should be afforded, and when not.' This suggest that the government are using the protection of the park as a benefit to their interests only and that they can pick a choose what to do with it. Yet the loss of the land is seen as a loss of our heritage and our past taking it away from us if the plan of overhead wires goes ahead.
Some see no problem in the overhead cables in national parks, they see it as a benefit of getting broadband out to more rural communities. Their argument is that the mast should be discreetly placed such as 'among trees'.
The article surrounds a disagreement of whether the cables should be put up. many disagree with the governments handling of the protection on these parks. Also Sarah Wright of Mast Sanity 'added that she was also concerned about the health implications for wildlife in the parks and beauty spots.' This would boost her argument of it being against the cables as she suggest that this may do some harm to the surrounding wildlife of the national parks. This could also spark interest of other organisation to do with animals to be against the cables in these rural areas. These issues and benefits are surrounded by parliament and the association that protect these parks. Both see the benefits of more broadband but the association see the issues that will be brought to the parks by the overhead cables.

15 November 2012 at 20:45

Well done Sam,

This is a strong answer and would gain you full marks. You are embedding quotation and developing a range of points that engage with the whole text in detail.

Did this take you 12 minutes to do?

If I was to be really picky - and this is to save you time in the exam - your quotations are a little overlong and the extra detail in the quotation doesn't add anything to your answer. If you keep the detailed explanation and shortened the quotations you could allow yourself more time for some of the more difficult questions.

Well done though - 8/8 the first full marks of the website!

15 November 2012 at 20:49

You're now developing a point to go with your quotation but in this question you need to embed quotations which you've moved away from with the linking phrase 'this is portrayed in'.

Simple solution - remove the linking phrase and the full stop and add 'and':

On the other hand it could ruin one of the top outdoor rural British attraction and 'it is feared that the Lake District landscapes that inspired William Wordsworth will be particularly under threat'.

Improving all the time - 5/8 to 6/8 - full marks would need the embedded quotations throughout.

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